Orange County California’s Medical Weight Loss Program Can Save Your Life

According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease, more than 2 in 3 adults are considered overweight or obese. It has become quite a prevalent problem today that even the World Health Organization has recognized it as a global epidemic. Overweight and obesity warrants this level of concern because it puts many people’s health at risk. Excessive weight leads to a number of short- and long-term issues.

Fortunately, cutting back weight can help reduce your risks of developing weight-related illnesses. Through a radical lifestyle change and professional help from medical doctors, chiropractors, dietitians, and psychologists, you can successfully improve your overall health. You can visit a medical weight loss clinic to have a better chance at avoiding these diseases linked to obesity and overweight.

High Blood Pressure Reduction With Medical Weight Loss

Having a large body mass means that your body works doubly hard to supply blood evenly to all the cells. A blood pressure reading of 130/85 mm Hg or higher is considered dangerously high. Research suggests that aside from obesity or overweight, a diet with high-sodium content contributes to increased blood pressure. Although hypertension or high blood pressure doesn’t usually have any notable symptoms, it can cause more serious problems like stroke, kidney failure, and heart disease.

Getting to an ideal BMI range through healthy weight loss greatly helps in lowering blood pressure. Doctors may also recommend switching to a low-sodium diet, and increasing intake of fruits, vegetables as well as low-fat dairy products.

Avoid Type 2 Diabetes With Our Weight Loss Program

High blood sugar is a common symptom of obesity. If your blood sugar reading reaches or exceeds 110 mg/dL, certain changes to your lifestyle must be made as high levels of blood sugar can eventually cause type 2 Diabetes. Type 2 diabetes, the most common type of diabetes, is the number one cause of stroke, heart disease, kidney disease, blindness, and amputation. It is a disease with a high rate of fatality, placing seventh on the list of leading causes of death in the US.

If you were already diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, losing weight will allow you to control your blood sugar levels to lessen the risks of developing side effects. Having a more balanced weight can also help increase the efficiency of diabetes medicine you take, thereby reducing your recommended dosage levels.

Strokes May Be Prevented Through Weight Loss

A stroke is caused by a sudden stop or decrease of blood flow to the brain. Without blood, the brain is then deprived of oxygen and nutrients, which are essential to the survival of brain cells. A stroke could occur due to a blood clot that blocks an artery connected to the brain (ischemic stroke) or when a blood vessel in the brain bursts (hemorrhagic stroke). In both types of stroke, high blood pressure is known to be the leading cause.

Strokes may be prevented through weight loss. With a more manageable weight, you can keep your blood pressure at a good level. Weighing less can also improve cholesterol level and blood sugar, which also helps lower the risks of stroke. Chances of developing other stroke-related issues like heart disease are also further reduced.

These are only some of the health risks of being obese or overweight. If you don’t work to lose those extra pounds, you might also develop, sleep apnea, osteoarthritis, fatty liver disease, kidney disease, and even certain kinds of cancers. Of course, to truly avoid these illnesses, you should also strive to maintain your weight loss. Gaining back what you shed could undermine all your previous efforts.

For a great weight loss experience, make sure to work with reputable professionals who have had years of experience in the weight loss industry. Approach companies like OC Wellness Physicians Medical Group to start your journey.

Sources:

What You Should Know Before You Start a Weight-Loss Plan, FamilyDoctor.org

Health Risks of Being Overweight, NIDDK.nih.gov